Thursday, December 12, 2019

TBL Editing Services now accepting manuscripts

Texas Book Lover Editing Services

"Having been on the receiving end of five of Michelle’s book reviews, I have to say that I (actually we, since Miles Arceneaux is the pen name for me and two collaborators) awaited each review with anticipation and some trepidation. Her reviews were always insightful, accurate, and spot on. They were also forthright—if the book had flaws, she would call them out. After each review, I remember wishing that we had had someone like her to edit our novels before publication. When I found out she had begun to offer that very thing, I sent her my recently completed manuscript straight away (different pen name, different collaboration). She did not disappoint. Whether you  decide to self-publish or are getting your book ready to pitch to an agent or publisher, I highly recommend Michelle’s editing service."
Brent Douglass (aka Miles Arceneaux, aka H.A. Douglass)

I am excited to announce that effective April 1, 2019 I began accepting manuscripts for editing.

I am a voting member of the National Book Critics Circle; a member of the Texas Press Association, Writers' League of Texas, and PEN America; and a former award-winning editor of the Texas Spur, a weekly newspaper since 1909. I have been an editor at Lone Star Literary Life since its founding in 2015. I have been a reviewer for Kirkus Indie and Foreword Reviews, and my work has been published or is forthcoming in Foreword ReviewsPleiadesRain TaxiWorld Literature TodayHigh Country NewsSouth85 JournalThe Review ReviewConcho River ReviewMonkeybicycleMosaic Literary MagazineAtticus Review, the Rumpus, Bookslut, PANK Magazine, and the Collagist.

Please carefully consider which level of attention your manuscript requires: paragraph-level editing (stylistic and structural), sentence-level editing (line editing or copy editing), or word-level editing (proofreading).

In my experience, many writers are skipping the copy editing process, assuming their beta readers have caught the large majority of errors. Many writers are dismayed and disappointed, even angry, when a proofreader finds a large number of errors in the final document; it means lost time and more money to fix a book that has already been designed or formatted.

The easiest way to distinguish between copy editing and proofreading is to consider when they occur during the editing process. Proofreading is the last step of editing; it happens after your book has been formatted for print or digital distribution and returned to you from your formatter or book designer. Proofreading occurs when your book is in its final form—the form your readers will buy.

For print books, proofreading will occur in PDF format; an e-book will be proofread as an epub or mobi file. In addition to language issues, such as typos, punctuation errors, and misspellings, the proofreader will also look for errors made during formatting and design.

The fewer changes you have to make at the proofreading stage, the better. Formatting or designing a book involves placing text so that your book looks good, the digital edition operates correctly, and both read well. Major changes, such as revising paragraphs and rearranging sentences, can ruin the carefully arranged layout of your book. Accordingly, you should only need to make minute changes at the proofreading stage.

Any corrections suggested by your proofreader will need to be performed by your formatter or designer.

Pricing: 
  • Proofreading (word-level editing): $2.00 per page
Upon completion of the service you will receive either a Word document with a list of required and suggested changes to the already formatted e-book; in the case of a print book, your choice of a marked PDF or a Word document. If I am hired to proofread, then upon beginning that process I determine that your manuscript needs copy editing, all work will cease, and I will consult with you regarding how to proceed.
  • Copy editing (sentence-level editing): $3.50 per page
Upon completion of the service you will receive your choice of either a Word document with tracked changes or without tracked changes. You will also receive an editorial style sheet based on the Chicago Manual of Style, 17th ed.; spellings follow Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed., first spelling, except where noted.
  • Stylistic and structural (paragraph-level editing, including copy editing): $5.00 per page
Upon completion of the service you will receive your choice of either a Word document with tracked changes or without tracked changes. You will also receive an editorial style sheet based on the Chicago Manual of Style, 17th ed.; spellings follow Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed., first spelling, except where noted.

Please plan on receiving your edited or proofread manuscript approximately two months from the date on which I receive your manuscript. Fees for a rush job, due in one month, include a surcharge of 25 percent.

I look forward to hearing from y’all and teaming up to make the world a safer, more satisfying place for readers everywhere.

Michelle

Tuesday, December 10, 2019

Giveaway: COVEY AND JAYJAY GET EDUCATED

COVEY AND JAYJAY
GET EDUCATED
by
Shelton L. Williams
Genre: Murder Mystery / Social Thriller / Amateur Sleuth
Publication Date: September 1, 2019
Number of Pages: 209 pages

Scroll down for a giveaway!


Amateur detectives Covey Jencks and JayJay Qualls are drawn into a triple murder on the campus of Baker College in West Waverly in the Texas Hill Country. Both end up taking positions at the college: Covey as an adjunct instructor and JayJay as a visiting actor. 

Initially they believe that money is the motive for the murders, but over time they learn that the college is a cauldron of political and social intrigue. The college's new president and his beautiful wife, various staff members, a prominent trustee, and parties not associated with the college have the motives, opportunities, and wacky agendas that might implicate them in the murders. It turns out that a white nationalist group may be using a college house for its nefarious activities, but are they more talk than action? 

The West Waverly police are little to no help in the investigation, and Covey himself has to depart the college to deal with his father's death. JayJay takes over and makes a critical breakthrough. Upon Covey's return, the couple must rely on deception, a bit of luck, and martial arts skills to solve the crimes and to try to prevent a high-profile assassination.



Shelton L. Williams (Shelly) is founder and president of the Osgood Center for International Studies in Washington, DC. He holds a PhD from Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, and he taught for nearly forty years at Austin College in Sherman, Texas. He has served in the US government on four occasions, and he has written books and articles on nuclear proliferation. In 2004 he began a new career of writing books on crime and society. Those books are Washed in the Blood, Summer of 66, and now Covey Jencks. All firmly prove that he is still a Texan at heart.

 Amazon Author Page  



-------------------------------------
GIVEAWAY!  GIVEAWAY!  GIVEAWAY!
FOUR WINNERS!GRAND PRIZE: signed copy of each of the author's books
SECOND PRIZE: signed copy of both Covey Jencks and Covey and JayJay Get Educated
THIRD PRIZE: Audio book of Covey and JayJay Get Educated
FOURTH PRIZE: Kindle version of Covey and JayJay Get Educated
DECEMBER 10-20, 2019
(U.S. Only)

a Rafflecopter giveaway


VISIT THE OTHER GREAT BLOGS ON THE TOUR:

12/10/19
Notable Quotable
12/10/19
Notable Quotable
12/11/19
Review
12/12/19
Author Interview
12/13/19
Review
12/13/19
Playlist
12/14/19
Review
12/14/19
Excerpt Part I
12/15/19
Excerpt Part II
12/16/19
Review
12/16/19
Notable Quotable
12/17/19
Review
12/18/19
Scrapbook Page
12/19/19
Review
12/19/19
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Monday, December 9, 2019

Monday Roundup: Texas Literary Calendar Dec 9-15, 2019

Bookish goings-on in Texas for the week of December 9-15, 2019, compiled exclusively for Lone Star Literary Life by Texas Book Lover. 

Special events this week include the National Book Foundation's “Literature for Justice: Women Writing Beyond Bars” in Dallas, the Dock Bookshop Holiday Expo in Frisco, and the
Laredo Book Festival.

For a complete calendar of bookish events in Texas this week, including daily listings and exhibits, visit the GO! Calendar at Lone Star Lit

Thursday, December 5, 2019

Cover Reveal: EXECUTION IN E by Alexia Gordon


Lone Star Literary Life EXCLUSIVE!
Lone Star Literary Life is honored to present the cover
of the fifth book in the Gethsemane Brown Mysteries
by Alexia Gordon & Henery Press.
To be released March, 2020


PRESENTING . . .



ABOUT THE BOOK:   Romance is in the air. Or on the ‘gram, anyway.

When an influencer-turned-bridezilla shows up at the lighthouse to capture Insta-perfect wedding photos designed to entice sponsors to fund her lavish wedding, Gethsemane has her hands full trying to keep Eamon from blasting the entire wedding party over the edge of the cliff.

Wedding bells become funeral bells when members of the bride’s entourage start turning up dead. Frankie’s girlfriend, Verna, is pegged as maid-of-honor on the suspect list when the Garda discover the not-so-dearly departed groom was her ex and Gethsemane catches her standing over a body.

Gethsemane uncovers devilish dealings as she fights to clear Verna, for Frankie’s sake. Will she find the killer in time to save Frankie from another heartbreak? Or will the photos in her social media feed be post-mortem?

EXECUTION IN E
TO BE FEATURED ON
LONE STAR BOOK BLOG TOURS
MARCH, 2020



ABOUT THE AUTHOR: A writer since childhood, Alexia Gordon won her first writing prize in the 6th grade. She continued writing through college but put literary endeavors on hold to finish medical school and Family Medicine residency training. She established her medical career then returned to writing fiction. Raised in the southeast, schooled in the northeast, she relocated to the west where she completed Southern Methodist University’s Writer’s Path program. She admits Texas brisket is as good as Carolina pulled pork. She practices medicine in North Chicago, IL. She enjoys the symphony, art collecting, embroidery, and ghost stories.
 ║  Website ║ Facebook ║ Instagram  
║ BookBub  ║ Twitter  Goodreads 




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Wednesday, December 4, 2019

TBL Editing Services now Accepting Manuscripts


Texas Book Lover Editing Services

"Having been on the receiving end of five of Michelle’s book reviews, I have to say that I (actually we, since Miles Arceneaux is the pen name for me and two collaborators) awaited each review with anticipation and some trepidation. Her reviews were always insightful, accurate, and spot on. They were also forthright—if the book had flaws, she would call them out. After each review, I remember wishing that we had had someone like her to edit our novels before publication. When I found out she had begun to offer that very thing, I sent her my recently completed manuscript straight away (different pen name, different collaboration). She did not disappoint. Whether you  decide to self-publish or are getting your book ready to pitch to an agent or publisher, I highly recommend Michelle’s editing service."
Brent Douglass (aka Miles Arceneaux, aka H.A. Douglass)

I am excited to announce that effective April 1, 2019 I began accepting manuscripts for editing.

I am a voting member of the National Book Critics Circle; a member of the Texas Press Association, Writers' League of Texas, and PEN America; and a former award-winning editor of the Texas Spur, a weekly newspaper since 1909. I have been an editor at Lone Star Literary Life since its founding in 2015. I have been a reviewer for Kirkus Indie and Foreword Reviews, and my work has been published or is forthcoming in Foreword ReviewsPleiadesRain TaxiWorld Literature TodayHigh Country NewsSouth85 JournalThe Review ReviewConcho River ReviewMonkeybicycleMosaic Literary MagazineAtticus Review, the Rumpus, Bookslut, PANK Magazine, and the Collagist.

Please carefully consider which level of attention your manuscript requires: paragraph-level editing (stylistic and structural), sentence-level editing (line editing or copyediting), or word-level editing (proofreading).

In my experience, many writers are skipping the copyediting process, assuming their beta readers have caught the large majority of errors. Many writers are dismayed and disappointed, even angry, when a proofreader finds a large number of errors in the final document; it means lost time and more money to fix a book that has already been designed or formatted.

The easiest way to distinguish between copyediting and proofreading is to consider when they occur during the editing process. Proofreading is the last step of editing; it happens after your book has been formatted for print or digital distribution and returned to you from your formatter or book designer. Proofreading occurs when your book is in its final form—the form your readers will buy.

For print books, proofreading will occur in PDF format; an e-book will be proofread as an epub or mobi file. In addition to language issues, such as typos, punctuation errors, and misspellings, the proofreader will also look for errors made during formatting and design.

The fewer changes you have to make at the proofreading stage, the better. Formatting or designing a book involves placing text so that your book looks good, the digital edition operates correctly, and both read well. Major changes, such as revising paragraphs and rearranging sentences, can ruin the carefully arranged layout of your book. Accordingly, you should only need to make minute changes at the proofreading stage.

Any corrections suggested by your proofreader will need to be performed by your formatter or designer.

Pricing: 
  • Proofreading (word-level editing): $2.00 per page
Upon completion of the service you will receive either a Word document with a list of required and suggested changes to the already formatted e-book; in the case of a print book, your choice of a marked PDF or a Word document. If I am hired to proofread, then upon beginning that process I determine that your manuscript needs copyediting, all work will cease, and I will consult with you regarding how to proceed.
  • Copyediting (sentence-level editing): $3.50 per page
Upon completion of the service you will receive your choice of either a Word document with tracked changes or without tracked changes. You will also receive an editorial style sheet based on the Chicago Manual of Style, 17th ed.; spellings follow Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed., first spelling, except where noted.
  • Stylistic and structural (paragraph-level editing, including copyediting): $5.00 per page
Upon completion of the service you will receive your choice of either a Word document with tracked changes or without tracked changes. You will also receive an editorial style sheet based on the Chicago Manual of Style, 17th ed.; spellings follow Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed., first spelling, except where noted.

Please plan on receiving your edited or proofread manuscript approximately two months from the date on which I receive your manuscript. Fees for a rush job, due in one month, include a surcharge of 25 percent.

I look forward to hearing from y’all and teaming up to make the world a safer, more satisfying place for readers everywhere.

Michelle

Tuesday, December 3, 2019

Excerpt: WHY STUFF MATTERS


WHY STUFF MATTERS
by
JEN WALDO

  Sub-genre: Literary Fiction / Humor
Publisher: Arcadia Books
Date of Publication: June 4, 2019 (US)
Number of Pages: 212



When Jessica, a grieving widow, inherits an antique mall from her mother she also inherits the stallholders, an elderly, amoral, acquisitive, and paranoid collection. 

When one of the vendors, a wily ex-con named Roxy, shoots her ex-husband, she calls on Jessica to help bury the body and soon Jessica is embroiled in cover-ups, lies, and misdirection. Into this mix comes Lizzie, Jessica’s late husband’s twelve-year-old daughter by his first marriage, who’s been dumped on Jessica’s doorstep by the child’s self-absorbed mother and it soon becomes apparent that Lizzie is as obsessed with material possessions as Jessica’s elderly tenants. 

Why Stuff Matters is a compelling ode to possession, why people like things and the curious lengths they will go to keep them. Returning to her fictional Caprock, Waldo turns her wry wit on the lives of those afraid to let go.




CLICK TO PURCHASE!


Excerpt from Chapter Two of
Why Stuff Matters
By Jen Waldo

If there’s one thing I know about tornadoes it’s that they’re capricious. This one skipped all over town, kicking up and down like a chorus girl. It took out the education building of the Lutheran church, but respectfully left the sanctuary alone. It wiped out the Sears store, cutting it off at the entrance to the mall with impressive precision; power tools, still in their packaging, were scattered all over the place. It took out the new elementary school which was the only school in town with a storm shelter; and though this was discussed on the local news as a pertinent aspect, the shelter really didn’t matter because not only had school already let out for the summer, the tornado swooped through on a Saturday night when no one would have been there anyway.
More relevant in my small sphere is that one of our own was killed. Pard Kemp—Pard being a nickname derived from a nickname. Eighty-six years old. It looks like his decision to take shelter in the basement of the Baptist church came thirty seconds too late; he was knocked on the head by a flying brick in the parking lot. He was an offensive old guy—smelly the way some old people get when they’re too tired to shower or do laundry. He had very little hair, only a few teeth, and an ornery disposition that made everybody wish he’d just go somewhere and die, which he finally did.
Pard operated the double-sized booth at the rear of the second floor, as far from the front door as possible. Secretive by nature, he preferred an inconvenient location. His is one of the more enticing booths—small household implements from the last half of the eighteen hundreds. Irons, washboards, chamber pots, bellows, cuspidors, farm tools. Wandering through his booth is like a trip back in time, and who doesn’t enjoy that?
Most troublesome is what he kept out of sight, locked in the deep bottom drawer of the cabinet at the back of his booth—handguns. The guns were most likely slipped from sweaty palm to sweaty palm, offered in payment for sly favors, or given to Pard for safekeeping. Unfettered by banalities such as documentation or licensing, the question about what to do with them is going to get the vendors worked up.
I checked earlier; there are a dozen of the bothersome things. I know nothing about small firearms. Most are black or dark gray; a couple of them are silver; some are smooth; some have textured grips. Manufacturers’ names are etched on the barrel or grip—Filigree, Walther, Desert Eagle, and Beretta. Various sizes, different barrel lengths. Mostly pistols, only two revolvers. Ammunition is boxed and set to the side—cartridges and bullets in different sizes. I have no idea what cartridges correspond to what weapons. It surprises me that they have an odor—machine oil is my guess.
Pard had no living family and he left no will. While this means his modest house on the west side will go to the state, the state’s not going to step in and claim all his old fixtures, tools, and prairie paraphernalia. I’ve scheduled a meeting to discuss the allocation of his inventory.
Around noon I haul the plastic chairs from the storage area in the east corner and set them up at the T-junction right in front of his booth. The vendors begin to limp in. There are forty-five of them, and all are in attendance, except Janet, who’s in Fort Worth awaiting the birth of her first great-grandchild. When everybody’s found a seat, I take the center position at the entrance to the booth. The folks shift and glare at each other and me. They’re grumpy. Every one of them is certain they’re going to lose out or be taken advantage of in some way.
“I should just absorb it all.” Dee’s laying claim right from the start. “It’ll fit right in with my inventory.”
I’m glad to see Dee’s sharp side; she’s been vague lately, forgetting names and getting turned around in the building. Her assertion is reasonable. Though her space is themed around a more feminine motif—brush-and-comb sets, jewelry boxes, elegant shawls and gloves of lace—her stock is from the same era. But of course this solution isn’t acceptable to the others.
“You’ve got no right to any of it,” Will says. “I’ve known Pard for fifty years.” Technically true, though they were hardly fond of one another.
“I get the guns.” This from Sherman, who thinks that seeing action in Korea entitles him to the weaponry. His inventory is military gear—service medals, canteens, hats and helmets, belts and boots. I guess he thinks small arms will fit in nicely.
“No,” I say. “They’ve got no documentation. I’m turning them over to the police.”
As proprietor of this raggedy-ass business, it’s my job to at least keep things looking like they’re on the up-and-up. My announcement is met with grumbling, which is nothing new. I haven’t done a thing since I took over last year that hasn’t been met with grumbling.
The reason for their objection isn’t that I’ve made an unfair or unwise decision. The problem is that these obsessive old people can’t bear to watch anything walk out the door. Handing the guns to the police goes against their code. Here, in this place, you don’t give things away. Every item has a price and until that price is met the item doesn’t move. Their attachment to their stuff is evident in the way they overprice every item (eighteen hundred dollars for a toy), the way they always manage to be elsewhere when someone who sincerely wants to buy walks through, the way they down-talk some of their best items. 




Jen Waldo lived in seven countries over a thirty-year period and has now settled, along with her husband, in Marble Falls, Texas. She first started writing over twenty years ago when, while living in Cairo, she had difficulty locating reading material and realized she’d have to make her own fun. She has since earned an MFA and written a number of novels. Her work has been published in The European and was shortlisted in a competition by Traveler magazine. Old Buildings in North Texas and Why Stuff Matters have been published in the UK by Arcadia Books. Jen’s fiction is set in Northwest Texas and she’s grateful to her hometown of Amarillo for providing colorful characters and a background of relentless whistling wind. 

◆  WEBSITE  ◆  TWITTER  
◆  AMAZON AUTHOR PAGE  ◆  
◆  GOODREADS AUTHOR PAGE   


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12/4/19
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12/6/19
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12/6/19
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12/7/19
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12/10/19
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12/11/19
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