Thursday, May 30, 2019

Book Blitz & Giveaway: BONNIE AND CLYDE: RADIOACTIVE


RADIOACTIVE
Bonnie and Clyde Series
Book Three
by
CLARK HAYS AND KATHLEEN McFALL
Genre: Historical / Alternative History / Romance 
Publisher:  Pumpjack Press on Facebook
Date of Publication: March 23, 2019
Number of Pages: 332

Scroll down for the giveaway!



Bonnie and Clyde: Defending the working class from a river of greed.


It’s January 1945, the height of World War Two. As the bloody conflict drags on, America has undertaken a massive top-secret effort to unleash the power of the atom and develop the first nuclear bomb. A network of Nazi and Soviet spies is determined to steal the technology, or failing that, sabotage the project. 

But first, they have to get past Bonnie and Clyde.

In a heart-pounding adventure spanning the windswept landscapes of eastern Washington to an isolated internment camp in the California mountains, Bonnie and Clyde face deception at every turn.

Can the former outlaws put aside their desire for revenge long enough to help end the war?

As in Resurrection Road and Dam Nation, the story cuts back and forth between 1984 where Royce, a washed-up investigative reporter, teams up with the now-elderly Bonnie Parker to hunt down the truth about their past, and the 1940s undercover exploits of the young Bonnie and Clyde.

And in Radioactive, Royce and Bonnie finally discover the devastating truth: Who Sal — the brains behind forcing Bonnie and Clyde into covert service defending the working class all those years ago — really was.







CLICK TO PURCHASE




Clark and Kathleen wrote their first book together in 1999 as a test for marriage. They passed. 


Radioactive is their seventh co-authored book. 


Twitter ║ Facebook ║ Instagram

Clark: GoodreadsAmazon
Kathleen: Goodreads ║ Amazon  




-------------------------------------
GIVEAWAY!  GIVEAWAY!  GIVEAWAY!
GRAND PRIZE: Signed copies of the full Bonnie and Clyde series
TWO WINNERS: Choice of print or eBook copy of Radioactive
May 23-June 1, 2019
(U.S. Only)

a Rafflecopter giveaway

VISIT THE OTHER GREAT BLOGS ON THE TOUR:

5/23/19
Review
5/23/19
Review
5/24/19
Review
5/24/19
Review
5/25/19
Review
5/25/19
Review
5/26/19
Review
5/26/19
Review


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Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Sneak Peek & Giveaway: HITCHIN' POST AND THE TORNADO TWISTIN' 4TH OF JULY CELEBRATION

HITCHIN' POST
and the Tornado Twistin'
4th of July Celebration
by
JULIE BARKER
illustrated by Carolyn Altman
  Genre: Children's Picture Book / Western / Fantasy
Publisher: BookBaby
Date of Publication: September 28, 2018
Number of Pages: 50

Scroll down for giveaway!


Hitchin’ Post, the cowboy jackrabbit, is back with an all new adventure on the 6Bs Ranch. 

Hitch’s brothers come to visit for the annual 4th of July rodeo and dance, but they get much more than a long-awaited visit with their brother. When a giant tornado threatens to cut their Independence Day celebration short, Hitchin’ Post, his brothers, and the rest of the cowboys have to work hard to save the ranch and the celebration. Hitchin’ Post shows that even though he is just a small jackrabbit, he has the courage it takes to bring everyone together to rebuild what the tornado destroyed. Because of old Hitch being a great leader, the 6Bs' 4th of July celebration will go on! 

This is the second book in the Hitchin’ Post series by Julie Barker, where Julie once again collaborates with her mother, artist Carolyn Altman, who provides the illustrations in this romping, stomping cowboy adventure!

PRAISE FOR THE BOOK:
Hitchin’ Post and the Tornado Twistin’ 4th of July Celebration is a brilliantly woven story with a strong plot that will easily entertain anyone. The illustrations by Carolyn Altman are fun and engaging, complementing the story. I love how Barker has written an interesting story that will teach kids how working together as a team makes the hard work a whole lot lighter and much more rewarding. – Readers’ Favorite, 5 STARS

CLICK TO PURCHASE



From Hitchin’ Post and the Tornado Twistin’ 4th of July Celebration
By Julie Barker and Illustrated by Carolyn Altman






Julie Barker is the author of Hitchin' Post, her debut children's storybook. With inspiration from her West Texas roots and being surrounded by the ranching heritage, Julie is fulfilling her dream of becoming a children's author. Along with the encouragement and beautiful illustrations from her mother and artist, Carolyn Altman, the story of Hitchin' Post the cowboy jackrabbit was born and is now officially a series. The second book, Hitchin' Post and the Tornado Twistin' 4th of July Celebration, was released September 2018.
WEBSITE  ┃  FACEBOOK   ┃  GOODREADS 



Carolyn Altman is an artist and the illustrator of the Hitchin’ Post children’s book series, in which she collaborated with her daughter, Julie Barker, the author. Carolyn resides in Vernon, Texas, with her husband Stanley. They have two daughters and six grandchildren, all of whom live nearby. “Touch the Heart with Original Art” is Carolyn’s slogan, which she has used for the past forty years as she creates lighthearted and inspiring art with subjects such as wildlife, horses, cattle, and cowboys, in hopes of helping to preserve this way of life for many years to come. 

The beginning of her art career consisted of using mostly oil and acrylic mediums, then Carolyn began creating baby memory books in which she incorporates her art into each page. Each baby memory book is personalized and truly a work of art in itself. Carolyn believes that her experiences throughout her life are what inspires her art. 

She has spent her life in West Texas surrounded by wide open spaces and the beauty of the farming and ranching heritage, and that way of life will always show up in her paintings and illustrations. Her latest creations include a series of angel paintings depicting what she deems most important in her lifeher faith. 

WEBSITE  ┃  INSTAGRAM  ┃  ETSY
TWITTER  ┃  PINTEREST  ┃  FACEBOOK 
-----------------------------------------
GIVEAWAY!  GIVEAWAY!  GIVEAWAY!

GRAND PRIZE:
Author and Illustrator Signed Copy of Hitchin' Post and the Tornado Twistin’ 4th of July Celebration + $50 gift certificate to CarolynAltmanArt.com; 
TWO WINNERS:  Signed Copy of the Book.
May 29-June 7, 2019
(U.S. Only)
CHECK OUT THE OTHER GREAT BLOGS ON THE TOUR:
5/29/19
Sneak Peek
5/29/19
BONUS Post
5/30/19
Review
5/31/19
Review
6/1/19
Review
6/2/19
Review
6/3/19
Playlist
6/4/19
Review
6/5/19
Review
6/6/19
Review
6/7/19
Review



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Monday, May 27, 2019

Monday Roundup: Texas Literary Calendar May 27-June 2, 2019

Bookish goings-on in Texas for the week of May 27-June 2, 2019 compiled exclusively for Lone Star Literary Life by Texas Book Lover.

SPECIAL EVENTS:
Writefest, Houston, May 27-June 2

Dallas Festival of Books & Ideas, May 28-June 1

Friends of the Dallas Public Library Book Sale (supporting summer reading programs), May 31-June 1

Agave Festival, Marfa, June 1-9

Authors in the Parks, various locations, June 1

18th Annual Book History Workshop, College Station, June 2-7

EXHIBITS:
Dead Tree Books, Memorial Day Poetry Readings, 12PM

TUESDAY, MAY 28:
Austin
The Dock Bookshop, Poetry and Open Mic, 8PM

Houston
The Mix, PuroSlam with DJ Donnie Dee, 9:30PM

The Twig Book Shop, Jo Watson Hackl reading and signing Smack Dab in the Middle of Maybe, 5PM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 29:
Austin
Central Presbyterian Church, BookPeople presents ADMIRAL WILLIAM MCRAVEN speaking and signing Sea Stories, 7PM [ticketed event]

Terrazas Branch Library, Chicon Street Poets presents Aural Literature May Reading, 7:30PM

Dallas
Austin
Blue Willow Bookshop, Abbigail N. Rosewood will discuss and sign her novel IF I HAD TWO LIVES, 7PM

Brasil, AIA Houston presents a talk comparing two cases of research, advocacy, and preservation of modern built heritage in U.S. cities, drawing on recent books, Heroic: Concrete Architecture and the New Boston and Imagining the Modern: Architecture and Urbanism of the Pittsburgh Renaissance, 6PM

Brazos Bookstore, State of the Art: A Discussion on Art Criticism organized by Gulf Coast, 6:30PM

Irving
South Irving Library, Retired City of Irving police officer Doug Hutchison and his wife Carol discussing and signing Behind the Texas Badge (proceeds to Texas chapters of Concerns of Police Survivors (COPS) and Texas Game Warden Association's Great Fall Huntventure, a program for the children of fallen officers), 7PM

San Antonio
Carmen De la Calle, Meditations on the Mind and Mouth: Jazz and Poetry with a Purpose featuring Andrea “VOCAB” Sanderson, 7:30PM

FRIDAY, MAY 31:
Austin
BookPeople, LORENE CARY speaking & signing Ladysitting, 7PM

BookWoman, Book Talk & Reading: Misogyny, Projective Identification, and Mentalization by Karyne Messina, 7PM

George Washington Carver Museum, KAZI Book Review 10th Anniversary: Hopeton Hay in conversation with Dr. Randal Jelks, author of FAITH AND STRUGGLE IN THE LIVES OF FOUR AFRICAN AMERICANS: Ethel Waters, Mary Lou Williams, Eldridge Cleaver, and Muhammad Ali, 6:30PM

Hearth & Soul ATX, A Mile Above Texas book signing with Jay B. Sauceda, 5PM

Dallas
Heroes Grill, Dallas Poetry Slam presents: Glowetry, 8PM

Interabang Books, the Dallas Books & Ideas Festival presents "The Literary City" with keynote speaker Oscar Cásares and a panel discussion with Sarah Hepola, Sanderia Faye, Ben Fountain, and Dr. Jaina Sanga (moderated by Lauren Smart), 7PM

Houston 
Brazos Bookstore, Writefest Keynote with Phong Nguyen, 6PM

Paris
The Blind Pig, Grand Opening Speakeasy Soiree, 8PM

SATURDAY, JUNE 1:
Austin



Mansfield
Half Price Books, Local Author Sundays: Meet local Indie authors and pick up their latest release, while supplies last

Richardson
The Drawing Board, Writing Workshops Dallas seminar: "How to Break into Ghostwriting" with  Blake Atwood, 3PM

Watauga

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Review: SPYING ON THE SOUTH by Tony Horwitz

I reviewed Spying on the South: An Odyssey Across the American Divide (Penguin Press) by NYT-bestselling author and Pulitzer-winning journalist Tony Horwitz, who's been following Frederick Law Olmsted about, for Lone Star Literary Life. Horwitz's immersive journalism holds up a mirror reflecting how our original sins are still with us.

TRAVEL/HISTORY
Tony Horwitz
Spying on the South: An Odyssey Across the American DividePenguin Press
Hardcover, 978-1-1019-8028-6 (also available as an e-book and an audiobook), 496 pgs., $30
May 14, 2019

Halloween night found Tony Horwitz in a Grafton, West Virginia, bar with a woman costumed as a member of the Butcher Babies, a heavy metal band. She eyes his work boots, plaid shirt, horn-rimmed glasses, and Carhartt jacket with the notebook and pencil in one pocket. “Let me guess,” she said in an exaggerated drawl. “Yankee boy, spyin’ on us hillbillies?”

Spying on the South: An Odyssey Across the American Divide is Tony Horwitz’s new release, following the New York Times bestselling Confederates in the Attic. Horwitz is a former war correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, Pulitzer Prize-winning national reporter, former New Yorker writer, and author of six previous books of nonfiction. His books are difficult to categorize—part reporting, part travelogue, part history, part sociological study.

In 1854, Frederick Law Olmsted, writing as “Yeoman” on assignment for a brand-new outfit called the New-York Daily Times, set out on a journey across the American South, exploring the phenomenon of “G.T.T.”—Gone to Texas—in the pivotal years just before secession and civil war, when anti-immigrant fervor was on the rise and the “native” Protestants claimed to be besieged. Olmsted’s purpose was to seek “reliable understanding of the sentiments and hopes & fears” of the South. He wanted to gather the facts to counter the diatribes and epithets flying from both sides. Sounds familiar: a divided nation, each faction convinced of its righteousness and the moral and intellectual bankruptcy of the other.

Horwitz thought it sounded familiar, so he set off in Olmsted’s footsteps. Alternating the narrative between Olmsted’s day and his own, Horwitz traveled by Amtrak, rental Kia, coal barge, steamboat, foot, and mule from Cumberland, Maryland, to Eagle Pass, Texas, to see what he could learn about our current state of affairs.

One of the most interesting theories Horwitz explores is the feudal region that sported an aristocracy now supports an authoritarian, if not monarchical, president. This goes hand-in-glove with a rejection of expertise and science, which Horwitz had thought “an appendix of the American mind: a vestigial organ.” As one Louisiana preacher wrote in a letter to the editor in the early 2000s, “Learning for the sake of learning is egg head, intellectual elitism.”

Horwitz crossed the Sabine on El Camino Real, expressing confusion behind the Pine Curtain, where certain towns which shall remain nameless still refer to “the Quarters,” that East Texas wasn’t western at all. Something he will learn on his way to the Rio Grande is that there are many Texases. He visits the holy ground of San Jacinto “amidst a petrochemical Mordor” and experiences the High Holy Days at the Alamo, Día de los Muertos in Eagle Pass, and mule trekking around Sisterdale which ended in a concussion.

Horwitz did enjoy the surface manners the South tends to display toward strangers. He was taken with the friendliness of Cajuns whom, when he told them they’d been described to Olmsted as “habitually gay and careless, as well as kind-hearted, hospitable, and dissolute,” agreed that was pretty accurate. Horwitz was energized by the service at Franklin Avenue Baptist in New Orleans where he became “a parody of a white guy in a black church, clapping out of unison and jerking like a headless chicken.” He was viscerally disturbed by the plantation tours and the description of a lecture about the Underground Railroad as “fun and entertaining.” I’ve traveled in places the State Department would rather I not and which inspire my mother to email articles about bombs to me, but the scariest place I’ve ever been is Mississippi.

If you’ve been paying attention, then you won’t find news in Spying on the South. Like Olmsted, Horwitz began this project hoping that Americans could “listen to each other and air their differences in a rational and coolheaded fashion.” He doesn’t say definitively whether that hope survived the journey. Olmsted’s hope did not. Horwitz’s form of interactive and immersive journalism, while mercifully light on judgmental conclusions and personal opinions, holds up a mirror reflecting how our original sins are still with us.

“Bottom line?” Dave from Goliad finally blurts, “The government won’t let us do whatever the hell it is we want to do. That’s it.” Sounds like anarchy to me